Egypt: Muslim Brotherhood and the Presidential candidate

Posted: April 1, 2012 in International
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A new Egyptian President will be elected on 23 and 24 May 2012 in Egypt. But who will really run this office as Egyptian President, after the Egyptian military council has pretty much ensconced at the top of this country and after the Islamic parties have won the last parliamentary elections in Egypt?

Contrary to all the announcements and promises on the part of the Muslim Brotherhood,  to not name any Presidential candidate for Egypt, something has changed, because they have done it. The deputy chairman of the Muslim Brotherhood, Khairat al-Shater, who has always stressed that he isn`t interested to be a Presidential candidate, will do this after all, in contrary to his statements.

The sixty-year-old Egyptian entrepreneur has changed his mind. Why not? If you have won the parliamentary elections due to various factors (e.g. the financial support from some Gulf States), why should one miss the chance to even gain more influence?


The Muslim Brotherhood isn`t stupid and also very well organized since years.  And because the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is the most organized party in this country, they have a really good chance to bring their “new” Presidential candidate to victory in Mai.

The Egyptians have opted for the Islamist parties, perhaps in the hope of social change or some changes, at least. But whether these changes will become reality, and then in the way how the so-called “Tahrir youth” wanted them, is difficult to say.

The religion, the radical interpretation of religion, has suddenly get higher priority in Egypt (and not only there…), and many Egyptians identify with them, even if the West seems to still not admit this and even if a Mr. ElBaradei still puts this into question. (Of course) Both the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis (Salafists / Salafiyah) are anxious to bring a theocracy to Egypt, it`s only questionable how much time they “need”.

Whether the so-called “revolution” in Egypt can still be saved depends largely on the economic development, but improvements are still hardly recognizable. The tourism branch is always not yet even close to the level as it was before the “Arab spring” in Egypt.

The economy is broke; the majority of Egyptians is impoverished, and the overall situation in Egypt is even worse than before the “revolution”. Any improvements are not in sight, even as billions flow into development and reconstruction projects. Billions from abroad, sure not without any own “goals”.

Added to this is still the confused political policy that leads to no decisions, since political and military council hinder each other. The fact that Egypt is religious radicalized, probably with the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis as a majority in parliament, is almost certain. Whether the liberals and the Egyptian youth from the “Tahrir Square” (Cairo) are able to prevent such changes, remains doubtful.

Many young Egyptians are not so enlightened and Western-oriented as Mr. ElBaradei wants to sell them. The majority of the Egyptian youth is barely trained and certainly catched by the ideas and ideals of the Islamists, at least, by the promises of them, as long as the youth is able to somehow expect an improvement in their situation.

The Egyptian people are religious and the trust in God is constantly one of the first things in their lives. But the trust in God alone will not help to change the situation of the individual, and this stance won`t reach many heads in the near future in Egypt. The fact that Egypt is further Islamized or at least is determined more religious, is even shown with the composition of the Egyptian Constituent Assembly, which was elected in late March.

Of the 100 members, 70 candidates are attributable to the so-called Islamist camp. Considering this developments in Egypt (Tunisia, Libya…), it`s sure interested that the West comforts themselves with the fairy tale that the Muslim Brotherhood has indeed become moderate now – moderate Islamists, a new development and a nice fairy tale.

Not to mention that even Mr. ElBaradei stressed recently, that the Muslim Brotherhood has interest, but at least, respect for pluralism and the rule of law. This means, the Muslim Brotherhood is doing that, what they have always done since their founding. Well, the mentioned statements from Mr. ElBaradei are soon to be revised.

The fact is, of whatever the new Egyptian Constitution will look like, it will definitely be more religious than the former Egyptian Constitution under Mubarak. The Islamic Sharia law should get a prominent place in the Egyptian Constitution, which is nothing bad at first sight, if one would refer to the parts of the Sharia law, which teach fairness and justice.

Whether the so-called “Egyptian revolution” still has a chance or whether Egypt will develop towards Afghanistan and Pakistan remains to be seen. We have willfully written this sentence more harsh. In any case, afterwards no one needs to whine, that these developments would have not been recognizable.

Maybe the Egyptian military will surprise all with a Coup? To stay in power even after the upcoming parliamentary elections? To be honest, such a Coup from the Egyptian military is not very likely. Currently, after the revolt against Mubarak and his “people”, the Egyptian military would have just a little chance against the Egyptians and such a “coup” would trigger a lot of violence and bloodshed.

It is an exciting “project” in Egypt. Although one thing is clear: Egypt is far away from a democracy like in the West, but who wanted to have this?

Image: Dino De Luca / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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